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M. Barsuglia et al., “Optical losses in a high-finesse 300 m filter cavity for broadband quantum noise reduction in future gravitational-wave detectors”, submitted to Physical Review D

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M. Barsuglia et al., “Optical losses in a high-finesse 300 m filter cavity for broadband quantum noise reduction in future gravitational-wave detectors”, submitted to Physical Review D

July 3, 2018      No Comments
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M. Barsuglia et al., "Optical losses in a high-finesse 300 m filter cavity for broadband quantum noise reduction in future gravitational-wave detectors", submitted to Physical Review D

Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors will be limited by quantum noise in a large part of their
spectrum. The most promising technique to achieve a broadband reduction of such noise is the
injection of a frequency dependent squeezed vacuum state from the output port of the detector,
with the squeeze angle is rotated by the reflection off a Fabry-Perot filter cavity. One of the most
important parameters limiting the squeezing performance is represented by the optical losses of the
cavity. We report here the operation of a 300-m filter cavity prototype installed at the National
Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). The cavity is designed to obtain a rotation of the
squeezing angle below 100 Hz. After achieving the resonance of the cavity with a multi-wavelength
system, the round trip losses have been measured to be between 50 ppm and 90 ppm. This result
demonstrates that, with realistic assumption on the input squeeze factor and on the other optical
losses, a quantum noise reduction of at least 4 dB in the frequency region dominated by radiation
pressure can be achieved.

Submitted to Physical Review D

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